Peer Scholarship Advice

The official blog of the Charles Center Peer Scholarship Advisors

Category: General Scholarship

Scholarship Opportunities Available to Freshmen

As a freshman, trying to find scholarship opportunities that are available to you can be an intimidating process. Many scholarships are restricted to only upperclassmen, so it can be discouraging to find that a program that you would like to apply for isn’t available to you yet. Luckily, whether you’re interested in study abroad, STEM research, or anything in between, there are plenty of scholarships out there that you can apply to now! Here are a few of these programs:

1. UK Fulbright Summer Institutes

Each summer the U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission offers several themed institutes across the U.K. for American freshmen and sophomores to explore U.K. culture, history, and heritage, as well as take part in an engaging academic experience.  Past institutes have included Shakespeare, climate change, and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Each institute is 3-6 weeks long and all expenses, including airfare, tuition and fees, and room and board are covered by the scholarship. To learn more about this opportunity, check out their website.

2. Critical Language Scholarships

Critical Language Scholarships are a U.S. State Department sponsored program providing two months of fully funded language study abroad during the summer.  CLS is specifically focused on languages that are important to U.S. national security interest, so it has programs in countries such as China, Morocco, Turkey, Russia, and others where critical languages are spoken. You can find more info about CLS on their website.

3. Boren Scholarships

The Boren scholarship is a U.S. government-sponsored program funding U.S. students’ study of less-commonly studied languages in regions of the world critical for U.S. national security. Its purpose is similar to that of CLS, but unlike CLS it provides funding for semester- and year-long study instead of just for the summer. Moreover, it is designed for students planning to work in the national security arena and includes a one-year government service requirement. The Boren Scholarship gives up to $20,000 to fund semester- and year-long programs for undergraduates, and up to $8,000 for summer programs for STEM students.  You can learn more about Boren here.

4. National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates

The NSF provides funding for research at any one of its Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) sites. These sites are located at universities around the United States, and they encompass a broad range of natural and social sciences. Students apply directly to the REU site that they are interested in, and if accepted they spend 10 weeks at that site conducting research led by faculty members. You can learn more about this program and find a list of REU sites here.

5. Charles Center Summer Scholarships

The Charles Center offers scholarships for William & Mary students from all academic disciplines to do summer research. The application includes a project proposal and personal statement as well as banner transcripts and one letter of recommendation. Applications for these research grants will be due at the end of February the spring before you do your project. You can find out more about Charles Center Summer Scholarships here.

6. National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. In order to be eligible, applicants must have a GPA of at least 3.3 out of 4.0 and have financial need. The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years. The summer after each year of receiving the scholarship, recipients must train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. Furthermore, after graduation they will continue their training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory, serving 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.  To find out more about NIH UGSP, check out their website.


Keep in mind that these are only a handful of the opportunities available for freshmen to apply for.  To look for more, be sure to check out Scholarship Search!

Furthermore, although many scholarships and fellowships do not allow freshmen to apply, it is never too early to start preparing.  Look through Scholarship Search, the William & Mary Scholarships page, and this blog to learn about different opportunities for students at every academic level, and pick a few that you’re interested in.  Once you have an idea of what opportunities you want to apply for in the future, you’ll be better able to set yourself up to be a qualified applicant by choosing coursework and activities that match those scholarships.


As always, thanks for reading!  For more info on these and other scholarship opportunities, check out Scholarship Search, keep following the scholarship blog, or bring your questions to the PSAs directly in the Charles Center Mondays through Fridays from 9am to 5pm. Good luck on all your apps!

Making a Research Presentation

Presenting on your research is an invaluable way to make connections with other scholars in your field of study and communicate to others why your research is important. However, it can often seem like a daunting challenge. It can be quite difficult to figure out how exactly to organize the discussion of your topic and to determine how much information to include so that your audience understands your research. Luckily, the following steps provide a guideline to help you turn a research project in any area of study into a compelling presentation.

Step 1:  Know Your Audience
The sort of presentation that you would give to a group of experts in your field is quite different from one that you would give in front of a general audience. If your audience is likely to be very knowledgeable about your topic, you can spend less time explaining the background and instead quickly jump into the technical details, but if you’re presenting for a general audience, you’ll want to spend more time making sure the audience understands the background. Think about the setting of your presentation. Is it an academic conference for other researchers in your field? Or is it something more general and open to everyone? Most of you reading this will probably be presenting at William & Mary’s Summer Research Showcase, and this falls into the latter category.

Step 2:  Motivate Your Research
One of the first things you do in your presentation should be answering the question of “so what?” Here you will lay out the goals of your research and explain how it is relevant to the real world. In particular, make sure you can explain why people who aren’t scholars in your field should care about the question you’re trying to answer. This is especially important if you are presenting in front of an audience who are not experts in your field. Try to give some specific examples of why your research is important.

Step 3:  Give Some Background Information
After you introduce your topic and its “so what” you’ll want to give background information about your area of study. You also may want to include a literature review of research in your field by other scholars. Without the context of this information, it will be difficult for your audience to understand why you are doing the specific investigation that you are presenting about. This overview of your topic should strike a balance between being broad enough that your audience understands the context of your research, but narrow enough that the background information doesn’t feel redundant. How you strike this balance will also depend on your audience’s level of expertise, so make sure you continue to keep that in mind!

Step 4:  Craft an Effective Research Question
Most likely if you’ve already done your research, you’ll already have written out a research question somewhere, such as in a grant proposal. However, as you’re making a presentation it’s good to remind yourself about what makes an effective research question. First of all, make sure that it is focused, not too broad or too narrow. It should also be concise; you want your research question to summarize the purpose of your research in only a sentence or two. Overall, your research question should give your audience a quick snapshot of the information that is to come later on in your presentation.

Step 5:  Explain Your Research Methods
Now that you’ve given the audience the background context and your research question, you can begin to go into more detail about the specifics of your research. If your research was an experiment, describe the experimental design. Explain the methods that you used to collect your data as well as the model that you used to analyze the data. You may also want to include challenges that you faced during the research, and any changes that you had to make to your original research plan in order to overcome those challenges.

Step 6:  Display Your Findings
This should naturally follow from your discussion of your research methods. If you do any sort of statistical analysis, this is where you’ll want to include it. This section is also where visual displays can be most helpful, so you’ll want to include graphs and charts if they’re applicable to your research. Make sure that all of your visuals show your data clearly and concisely, labeling everything so that your audience knows what they’re looking at. If your visuals are effective, you’ll hardly need to include words on this section of the presentation at all, although you will want to explain verbally the data in your visuals.

Step 7:  Discuss your Results and Draw Conclusions
Here you will use the findings that you showed your audience from the previous step to answer your research question. Or, if you aren’t quite able to answer your research question yet, discuss what you have found so far and what future research could be done to fully answer the question. In this section, you’ll also want to make reference to your “so what” and the research goals that you outlined at the beginning of your presentation.

Step 8:  References and Acknowledgements
Although you’re done with the content of your presentation, you can’t forget to cite your sources. Use the format (APA, MLA, Chicago, etc.) preferred in your field of study and be consistent, using the same format throughout. And finally, make sure that you thank your advisor, the source of your funding, and anybody else who helped you out during your research.


As always, thanks for reading! If you have any questions about presenting on your research, applying for research grants, or anything scholarship related, please stop by the PSA office from 9am to 5pm Mondays through Fridays.

Scholarships for Funding Graduate School

 1. Fulbright U.S. Student Program
The Fulbright U.S. Student Program gives U.S. students funding to research, study, and teach English abroad. It has two different components: English Teaching Assistantships and Academic Grants, and in many countries the Academic Grants can be used to fund a year-long master’s degree program. Every year, numerous William & Mary students apply for and are awarded Fulbright Grants of both types. For more information on Fulbright, check out their website, the W&M specific website, and our other blog posts on the program.

2. Churchill Scholarship
The Churchill Scholarship provides funding for Master’s degrees in STEM fields at the University of Cambridge. Applying students must be undergraduate seniors or have graduated within the past 12 months. Applicants should have outstanding academic records and demonstrate strong research ability. To learn more about the Churchill Scholarship, visit their website.

3. Beinecke Scholarship
The Beinecke Scholarship provides funding for exceptional students with financial need to pursue graduate study in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Students apply as juniors, and receive $4,000 for the rest of their undergraduate degree along with $30,000 to fund their graduate program. For more information on Beinecke, visit their website or the W&M specific website.

4. Knight-Hennessy Scholarship
The Knight-Hennessy Scholarship provides full funding for any graduate degree at Stanford University. Applicants must be current seniors or have graduated from their undergraduate program within the past four years and must apply separately to the specific degree program that they intend to pursue. Knight-Hennessy is especially looking for students who have independence of thought, purposeful leadership, and a civic mindset. To learn more about Knight-Hennessy, visit their website.

5. Truman Scholarship
The Truman Scholarship provides $30,000 to fund a graduate degree in a public service field, although public service is defined broadly and can include graduate degrees such as law or medicine. Applicants apply as juniors and should demonstrate a history of service, leadership, and individual initiative. For more information on Truman, visit their website or the W&M specific site.

6. Schwarzman Scholarship
The Schwarzman Scholarship provides a fully funded one-year Master’s Degree in Global Affairs from Tsinghua University, one of the most prestigious universities in China. Applicants should be current seniors or graduates between the ages of 18 and 29, and they should demonstrate strong leadership potential and knowledge of current affairs. To find out more about this program, visit their website.

7. Marshall Scholarship
Marshall Scholarships fund one- or two-year Master’s Degrees in the United Kingdom. Applicants must be current seniors or recent graduates from their undergraduate program, and they must have a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Selection committees are seeking students who have potential to excel as scholars as well as to contribute to greater understanding between the U.S. and U.K. To learn more about Marshall, visit their website or the W&M specific site.

8. Mitchell Scholarship
The Mitchell Scholarship program is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to community and public service. Scholars study for one year in any discipline offered by the graduate institution of their choosing in either Ireland or Northern Ireland. The Mitchell Scholarship provides full funding for scholars’ tuition and living expenses. Seniors and recent graduates under the age of 30 with strong academic records and U.S. citizenship are eligible to apply. To learn more about Mitchell, visit their website.

9. Gates Cambridge Scholarship
The Gates Cambridge Scholarship fully funds graduate study in any field at the University of Cambridge, including all university fees, a maintenance allowance, airfare, and inbound visa costs. Scholars are expected to maintain academic excellence, demonstrate exceptional leadership potential, and have committed themselves to improving the lives of others. Applicants must be enrolled, degree-seeking seniors with a strong academic record applying to pursue a full-time residential course of study in a graduate program. Applicants may be from any country outside the United Kingdom. To learn more about Gates, visit their website.

10. Rhodes Scholarship
The Rhodes Scholarship provides full financial support for young Americans for graduate study at the University of Oxford. Rhodes Scholars are chosen not only for their outstanding scholarly achievements, but for their character, commitment to others and to the common good, and for their potential for leadership in whatever domains their careers may lead. Seniors and recent graduates under the age of 24 with strong academic records and either U.S. citizenship or at least five years of permanent residency are eligible to apply. To learn more about Rhodes, visit their website or the W&M specific website.

11. Pickering Fellowship
The Pickering Fellowship is intended for students preparing to enter the Foreign Service. It provides students with up to $37,500 annually for a two-year master’s degree in fields related to the foreign service including but not limited to business administration, economics, public policy, and international affairs. In addition, the Fellowship provides an overseas summer internship, a domestic internship, and mentoring from a current Foreign Service officer. Each successful candidate is obligated to work for five years as a Foreign Service officer. For more information on Pickering, visit their website.

 


Keep in mind that these are only a few of the many opportunities for current or soon-to-be graduates to continue their studies. For more info about all kinds of scholarships and fellowships, check out Scholarship Search, keep following the scholarship blog, or bring your questions to the PSAs directly in the Charles Center Mondays through Fridays from 9am to 5pm. Good luck on all your apps!

Scholarships for STEM Students

1. National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates
The NSF provides funding for research at any one of its Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) sites. These sites are located at universities around the United States, and they encompass a broad range of natural and social sciences. Students apply directly to the REU site that they are interested in, and if accepted they spend 10 weeks at that site conducting research led by faculty members. You can learn more about this program and find a list of REU sites here.

2. Udall Scholarship
The Udall Scholarship has two awards:  one is for Native American students interested in studying tribal policy, and the other is for students interested in studying either environmental science or environmental policy. The award includes $7,000 towards academic expenses as well as participation in a Scholar Orientation to network with other alumni and learn new skills. You can find out more about Udall here.

3. Goldwater Scholarship
The Goldwater Scholarship provides $7,500 per year towards academic expenses of students planning to enter a career of research in the natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics. Students apply as sophomores or juniors and are selected based on grades, recommendations, and especially research experience and research potential. To find out more about Goldwater, visit their website

4. Churchill Scholarship
The Churchill Scholarship provides funding for Master’s degrees in STEM fields at the University of Cambridge. Applying students must be undergraduate seniors or have graduated within the past 12 months. Applicants should have outstanding academic records and demonstrate strong research ability. To learn more about the Churchill Scholarship, visit their website.

5. Charles Center Summer Scholarships
The Charles Center offers scholarships for William & Mary students from all academic disciplines, including STEM, to do summer research. The application includes a project proposal and personal statement as well as banner transcripts and one letter of recommendation. Applications for these research grants will be due at the end of February the spring before you do your project. You can find out more about Charles Center Summer Scholarships here.

6. Smaller Opportunities
In addition to these larger and more well-known STEM scholarships, there are a number of smaller ones that may fit your interests:

  • KAUST:  Scholarship for graduate study in Saudi Arabia (learn more here)
  • DAAD:  Opportunities for funded study, research, and internships in Germany (find out more here)
  • Department of Homeland Security STEM summer internships (find out more here)
  • Committee on Sustainability (COS) Summer Research Grants: funds research on sustainability at William & Mary (learn more here)

Keep in mind that these are only a few of the many opportunities available for STEM students. For more info about these and other kinds of scholarships and fellowships, check out Scholarship Search, keep following the scholarship blog, or bring your questions to the PSAs directly in the Charles Center Mondays through Fridays from 9am to 5pm. Good luck on all your apps!

Scholarship Interview Tips

Interviews are a required part of the application process for many prestigious national awards; all of the following scholarships include some sort of interview component:

  • Marshall Scholarship
  • Mitchell Scholarship
  • Rhodes Scholarship
  • Boren Scholarship/Fellowship
  • Fulbright Scholarship
  • Luce Scholarship
  • Truman Scholarship

Interviews give selection committees an opportunity to see who you are in person instead of just on paper, and you can use them to show a different side of yourself than the one in your essays and transcripts. Every scholarship has a slightly different process for interviewing and selecting awardees, but the following tips will give you a leg up on just about any scholarship interview:

1. Research the Scholarship
What about this scholarship appeals to you? Who founded the scholarship and what is its exact purpose? Even if your interviewer doesn’t ask you these exact questions, knowing this information will be very helpful to you as you answer their questions. Knowing facts about the scholarship will show that you’re dedicated to it and prepared to take on whatever challenges it may present. Moreover, if your scholarship takes place abroad, do some research on the local culture (e.g. the UK for a Marshall Scholarship, whatever country you choose for Fulbright).

2.
 Know what Type of Interview You’ll Have
Will you have a one-on-one interview or a panel interview? Will it be in person or by phone or skype? How formal will you have to dress? Most of this information will probably be given to you clearly by the scholarship’s selection committee, but it’s important to make sure you know it so you’re not caught off-guard!

3. Read up on Current Events
Most scholarships are looking for applicants who are not only well read in their area of study, but also well-rounded individuals overall, and part of this involves being aware of current events in the U.S. and the world. This is especially important if you’re applying for a scholarship for study abroad or for studying policy/international relations. Be sure to pay attention to the news in the days and weeks leading up to your interview, so you can form your own opinions about relevant events and issues and be prepared to answer questions about them.

4. Construct a Cohesive Narrative of Your Past, Present and Future
What events in your life have led you to where you are now? Where do you see yourself going in the next few years, and how does this scholarship fit into that? Prepare in advance some points that you’d like to talk about, and shape your answers to include them. Review your academic, work, travel, and personal experiences to come up with specific examples that illustrate each point that you’ll want to make during your interview.

5. Prepare Your Own Questions for the Interviewers
Almost all interviewers will allow you to ask them questions at the end of the interview, and what you ask them can reveal as much about you as how you respond to their questions. Make sure to have done your research beforehand so you don’t ask anything that you could easily find the answer to on the scholarship’s website, and have a wide range of possible questions ready. For many scholarships, the interviewers are alumnae of the scholarships themselves, so this can be a great opportunity to ask about their personal experiences.

6. Practice
This is perhaps the most important part. You can come to the PSA office or the Cohen Career Center to do a more formal mock interview, but don’t discount the utility of just practicing with your friends or family to help you become more comfortable with the interview process. Also consider practicing with a professor in the field of study that you’re applying for, as they will be able to ask more in depth questions than someone who isn’t knowledgeable about your field. Overall, try to practice many times and in a variety of settings, formal and informal.


As always, if you have any questions about these or other opportunities, or you want someone to look over your application materials, don’t hesitate to come into the PSA office any time from 9 to 5 Monday through Friday! Thanks for reading!

Personal Statement Tips

Personal statements are a major part of the applications for many awards, including Fulbright Grants, Charles Center Summer Scholarships, and Rhodes Scholarships. Personal statements play an important role in helping selection committees get to know you as an individual and give you an opportunity to show your background in ways much deeper than your transcripts or resume could. Every scholarship, fellowship, and internship will ask different questions for its personal statement, so you’ll have to keep those in mind, but here are a few general tips that can help you write any personal statement:

1. Reflect on Your Background
What unique experiences do you have that have led you to become who you are now? What challenges (academic, health, family) have you had to overcome in your life? How has your background driven you to apply for this specific program, and how does it make you qualified for this program? These are all questions that you will want to keep in mind while writing a personal statement, and answering them can make your writing and your application overall much stronger. Just saying that you’re interested in the research or other work that you’ll be doing in your program may not be enough; it is even better to show through your writing how your background and experiences have shaped your interests. You could discuss personal/family connections with your area of interest, classes that you’ve taken that made you interested in it, or anything in between. This will reflect even greater commitment to the purpose of your program.

2. Think about Your Future Plans
What do you plan to do immediately after you finish your program? What about your long-term career and life goals? It’s very important that you show in your personal statement how your future plans motivate you to complete your chosen program. If your life goal is to become a teacher or work in education policy, it will be easy to show your motivation in doing a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship, but if your future plans and the program you’re applying to aren’t as obviously connected, or if you’re not sure about your future plans, this can be a challenge. Either way, it will require some self-reflection, and talking to friends and mentors can help you make this connection.

3. Create a Narrative
When writing about your past, present and future, don’t fall into a trap of just listing off facts about what you’ve done or plan to do. A great personal statement builds off of the writers past experiences and future plans to construct an overall narrative. This cohesively shows to the selection committee how you became interested in your chosen program, what you will get out of the program, and how you will use that experience to achieve your future goals. Moreover, essays with a strong and unique narrative will be a lot more memorable for selection committees, and will help you stand out as a candidate.

4. Don’t Be Arrogant, but Don’t Be too Humble
Getting the tone right is an important part of any piece of writing, and the balance that you need to strike for a personal statement is especially challenging. You need to convey confidence that you are qualified for your chosen program, but if you overdo it you may be perceived as arrogant. Saying “I think that this project might help some people” is clearly underselling yourself, but a statement like “This project will forever change the process of diplomatic negotiations among countries in the Middle East” is will probably come off as overconfident. Something like “This project will provide a strong foundation for future studies into the diplomatic relationship between countries in the Middle East” sounds better and is likely more accurate than the two above. Simply state your qualifications and/or project plans honestly and without exaggeration.

5. Don’t Be too Colloquial, but Don’t Sound too Academic
You want your personal statement to sound like you, but not the most colloquial and informal version of you. Moreover, you want your personal statement to be easy to read, even for people who are not in your field of study, as selection committees are usually made up of people in many academic disciplines. This can be another challenging balance to strike, and often different people will find that different writing styles best suit them. Have someone who knows you well read it over to get their impressions on how well you’ve struck this balance.

6. Have a Strong Beginning
Having a strong opening sentence or paragraph can go a long way in making sure that the reader stays engaged and interested in what you’re writing throughout your personal statement. Many applicants like to open their personal statements with an anecdote; this can be a strong beginning hook, but it can be easy for an anecdote to get off topic. If you’re going to take this route, make sure that you find a clear way to connect your anecdote with the rest of the personal statement. Aside from anecdotes, there are many other ways to begin your personal statement. Some people will begin with a thesis statement-style summer of what is to come in the rest of the essay; this can be very concise and clear in showing what you will talk about in your personal statement, but might not grab the reader’s attention as much as an anecdote. There are advantages and disadvantages of all different kinds of openings, and you should try a few out and see which one works best for you.

7. Have a Strong Ending
As the final thing that the selection committees read, your conclusion will leave a lasting impression, so you need to make sure that it’s a good one. Many applicants like to end their personal statements with a short summary of what they talked about in the preceding paragraphs; this can be a good cohesive way to conclude, but it may seem dry and redundant. Others may use the conclusion as a space to talk about future plans if they don’t earlier on in the essay. The ending often feels like a natural place to discuss the future plans, but if those plans aren’t thoroughly described and connected to the program and your past experiences, this may read like an addition that is tacked on last-minute without much thought. If you open with an anecdote, you may want to reference the anecdote in your conclusion. This makes the essay feel more cohesive, but again it can be difficult to clearly connect your anecdote to the topic or purpose of the program. As with the beginning, try out different types of ending and works best with your writing.

8. Pick an Overall Structure that Works for You
Make sure that the flow of ideas from one sentence or paragraph to the next makes sense. For some people this will mean simply going in chronological order, but there are many other ways that you could connect your ideas coherently. You could also structure your essay based on your academic development or how you narrowed the scope of your research/academic interests. Some personal statements may start with a description of the present or recent past, and then go on to describe earlier events that led up to that. There are as many ways of structuring a personal statement as there are people in the world, but make sure that yours is cohesive and fits well with the content that you’re describing.

9. Edit, Revise, and Rewrite
Your personal statement won’t be perfect on your first try, but that’s ok! It will usually take multiple edits and rewrites for you to get to a final draft that you’re happy with. It’s also a good idea to have others read your essay and give you ideas for what could be improved in your writing. The PSAs are a great resource for this, and we’re happy to help with your personal statements for all kinds of awards!

On a related note, make sure that you edit and revise your personal statement to fit whatever specific program you’re applying to. It’s not a good idea to directly copy and paste your personal statement from one application to another without making some changes because each program has different requirements and will ask different questions for the personal statement. You can keep the big ideas the same, but make sure you modify it to fit whatever you’re applying to.


As always, if you have any questions about these or other opportunities, or you want someone to look over your application materials, don’t hesitate to come into the PSA office any time from 9 to 5 Monday through Friday! Thanks for reading!

Internationally Oriented Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships

Are you a rising senior looking to do research or find other professional or academic development after graduation? Are you interested in international affairs or doing research of any kind abroad? If so, check out some of these international-oriented scholarship and fellowship opportunities that you can apply for to help you develop academically and professionally as well as give you time after graduation to help decide your next step:

1. Fulbright
If you’re interested in going abroad after graduation, there are tons of opportunities for you! One of the most popular options for post-graduate research and study is the Fulbright Scholarship. It has two very different components:  the English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) and the Academic Grant. The Fulbright ETA program funds one year of English teaching and the Academic Grant one year of graduate study and/or research in countries across the globe. You can find more info about both on Fulbright’s website and on William & Mary’s Fulbright page.

2. Luce
If you have limited experience in Asia, but are interested in spending time there learning and gaining professional experience, then take a look at the Luce Scholarship! It provides one year of professional placement designed to enhance the understanding of Asia among potential leaders in American society who have limited experience with Asia. Students may be placed in Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, or Vietnam. For more info, check out their website.

3. Blakemore Foundation Freeman Fellowship
Another opportunity for those interested in going to Asia, Blakemore Foundation Freeman Fellowships provide a year of intensive language study of an East or Southeast Asian language. This fellowship is intended for recent graduates who are pursuing a career that involves the regular use of the language that they choose. Fellows must already have a high degree of proficiency in the language that they choose, and they can choose from a preselected set of programs in Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Myanmar, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, or Vietnam. Learn more about this program here.

4. James C. Gaither Junior Fellowship
Students interested in international affairs should check out the James C. Gaither Junior Fellowship. It is designed to provide a substantive work experience for students who have a serious career interest in the area of international affairs. Approximately 10-12 students will be hired to work at the Carnegie Endowment in Washington, DC on a full-time basis for a period of one year and earn $38,000 with benefits. Past projects include Democracy and the Rule of Law, Nuclear Policy, Energy and Climate, Middle East Studies, South Asian Studies, China Studies, Japan Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Economics (Asia program), and Russian and Eurasian Studies. Find out more information here.

5. Princeton Fellowships
Princeton University offers three fellowship programs for students interested in different areas of the world:  Princeton in Africa, Princeton in Asia, and Princeton in Latin America. These programs are intended to foster mutual appreciation and cultural understanding by connecting service-minded graduates and partner organizations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America through immersive work experiences. Applicants are able to indicate preference for specific countries and issue areas. The program provides fellows with a local salary while in their host country, however, fellows are responsible for their own program fees and airfare. Princeton in Latin America requires proficiency in Spanish, French, or Portugese, but most placements with Princeton in Asia and Princeton in Africa do not require previous language study. Seniors and recent graduates are eligible to apply. You can find out more information on their websites for Princeton in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.


Keep in mind that these are only a few of the many opportunities for current or soon-to-be graduates to continue their studies or gain valuable work experience. For more info about all kinds of scholarships and fellowships, check out Scholarship Search, keep following the scholarship blog, or bring your questions to the PSAs directly in the Charles Center Mondays through Fridays from 9am to 5pm. Good luck on all your apps!